Amherst Wire

Trump’s 1776 Commission will attempt to erase history

Trump's 1776 Commission will attempt to erase history

Faith Cardoza, Politics and Op/Ed Editor

September 25, 2020

In a speech at the National Archives on Sept. 17, President Trump announced that he will sign an executive order to establish the 1776 Commission. The purpose of this commission is to “promote patriotic education” in public schools.

Trump’s negligence of climate change is killing us

Trump's negligence of climate change is killing us

Chloe Lindahl, Writer

September 24, 2020

Delayed responses to the west coast wildfires coincide with Trump’s belief that climate change is an agenda of his political opponents.

The passing of the Supreme Court Justice and women’s rights champion, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, sets the stage for a nasty political fight

The passing of the Supreme Court Justice and women’s rights champion, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, sets the stage for a nasty political fight

Faith Cardoza, Politics/Op-Ed Editor

September 20, 2020

She was the director of of the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union, and argued for six major cases to the Supreme Court regarding gender equality. Her position on the Supreme Court now being vacant has the power to shape the nation for generations to come.

It’s time that faculty-student relationships, in all forms, are prohibited at UMass Amherst

It’s time that faculty-student relationships, in all forms, are prohibited at UMass Amherst

Joanna Buoniconti, Copy/Managing Editors

September 15, 2020

Other colleges within the five-college-consortium have taken the initiative to ban faculty-student romantic relationships, while in a Masslive article it was stated that at UMass they are only “strongly discouraged.”

The ostentatious debate of mail-in voting

The ostentatious debate of mail-in voting

Chloe Lindahl, Writer

September 14, 2020

Mail-in voting dates all the way back to the Civil War when both Union and Confederate soldiers were allowed to submit their votes through mail amidst the ongoing war. Since then, over 30 states have established a “no excuse” absentee ballot rule meaning anyone can request to vote by mail whether they are able to make it to the polls or not.

MASSPIRG co-hosts 50th Earth Day anniversary celebration for 100% renewable energy

MASSPIRG co-hosts 50th Earth Day anniversary celebration for 100% renewable energy

Rebecca Duffy, Campus News Editor

April 23, 2020

MASSPRIG celebrated Earth Day's 50th anniversary by co-hosting a virtual event for 100% renewal energy.

Quick Fix Politics Podcast: Talking with the President of the UMass Democrats

Quick Fix Politics Podcast: Talking with the President of the UMass Democrats

Joe Kochapski

March 3, 2020

Joe Kochapski talks with Tim Ennis, President of the UMass Democrats about coronavirus updates, the Trump-Taliban agreement, violence at Greece and Turkey border over migrants, and Bernie’s rise.

Blurring the lines: Why Brazil’s growing relationship with the U.S is troubling

(Alan Santos / Wikimedia Commons)

Drew Sullivan, Writer

February 27, 2020

While some may write this off as paranoid and speculative, the USA's backing of Brazil's 20-year dictatorship, which resulted in the torture, murder, and illegal arrest of thousands, is all the historical justification I need to be concerned.

How to vote in the primaries from UMass Amherst

How to vote in the primaries from UMass Amherst

Rebecca Duffy, Campus News Editor

February 22, 2020

The Massachusetts state primaries are fast approaching, taking place on Tuesday, March 3. If students registered to vote in the primaries before the February 12 deadline, they are eligible to vote in Amherst.

Professor Paul Collins on President Trump’s impeachment

(Jonathan Kermah and Patrick Kline/Amherst Wire)

Faith Cardoza, Writer

February 20, 2020

New podcast: Faith Cardoza is joined by Professor Paul M. Collins Jr. to get some of his insight into the impeachment of President Trump and what it means in today’s context.

In defense of the comment section

(TNIOP/Wikimedia Commons)

Drew Sullivan, Contributor

February 11, 2020

In today's ever-evolving digital media landscape, the comment section has become somewhat omnipresent. While some regard it as the great public commons, many others consider it The Wild West of the Internet, where one can find intelligent rebuttals, vitriolic attacks, and irrelevant conjecture.

What happened in the Iowa Caucus?

(Screenshot from HuffPost / HuffPost)

Harry Ortof, Politics and Op/Ed Editor

February 6, 2020

After over a day of incomplete results flowing in from the 2020 Iowa Caucus, the issues that have plagued this election process continue to rear their ugly heads.  The informal process consists of moving to a specific part of a gymnasium or community center to endorse a candidate of their choice. If their candidate gets less than 15 percent of the votes, they must either choose another candidate or abstain. This is an important distinction between a primary and a caucus—your second vote can have an impact, especially if there's 12 people running.  

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